POLCAN2ID#: 3009
Date: 2017-09-20
Time: 00:00:00
Sent by:
Category: Conference
Subject: University of New Brunswick's Peace and Friendship Treaty Days - Registration open



The Mi'kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick is proud to announce that registration is now open for the University of New Brunswick's third annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days, to be held this year on October 23 and 24, 2017 on the University of New Brunswick's Fredericton campus. 

 

To register and for further details, go to  http://www.unb.ca/conferences/peaceandfriendshiptreatydays/

 

On this, the 150th anniversary of the passage of the British North America Act, the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick will hold the University of New Brunswick’s 3rd annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days. Events will include a keynote talk by Senator Daniel Christmas, an active leader in the Membertou First Nation in Cape Breton and the Mi'kmaw Nation of Nova Scotia, a re-enactment of the signing of the Treaty of 1725, the first Peace and Friendship Treaty between the Wabanaki Nations and the British Crown, and a colloquium, which will address topics related to the role of Indigenous political traditions and treaty-making, especially among the Wabanaki nations, in providing the inspiration and foundation for the creation and evolution of the Confederation of the British North American colonies from 1867 to today.

 

The 150th anniversary of the legal creation of the political community we know as Canada is certainly worthy of celebration, but Canadian Confederation is neither merely 150 years old nor is it solely the creation of white colonists. The roots of Confederation rest in the nourishing soil of Indigenous political traditions of confederacies, including the Wabanaki Confederacy, and were fed by the tradition of treaty-making between Indigenous nations and the British Crown. The Peace and Friendship Treaties between the British Crown and the nations of the Wabanaki Confederacy were among the earliest of these treaties. As well, despite the efforts of federal governments since Confederation to make Indigenous peoples invisible in Canada’s political community through assimilationist policies, the resilience of Indigenous peoples has meant that Indigenous political traditions continue to influence the evolution of the Canadian political community today.

 

We welcome you to participate in this year's UNB Peace and Friendship Treaty Days. Remember, to register and for further information, go to http://www.unb.ca/conferences/peaceandfriendshiptreatydays/




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